Posts Tagged ‘Low-carbohydrate diet’

Kindle Version of Feline Nutrition Book, Free For Limited Time

"Feline Nutrition" BookBeginning Thursday, September 5 through Monday, September 9, my book, Feline Nutrition – Nutrition for the Optimum Health and Longevity of your Catwill be offered free through Amazon. This applies only to the Kindle version of the book.

The special should begin at midnight PST on the 5th and end at midnight PST on the 9th.

You do not need to have a Kindle to read the book. You can download for free the Kindle app for just about any platform, including your PC.

If you do own a Kindle, you can also loan this book to anyone else who is a Kindle owner. As always, it is part of the Kindle Owners Lending Library (KOLL) and you may borrow the book from Amazon for free at any time.

High-Protein, Low-Carb Cat Food Wins Again

Dietary therapy has been considered important in the management of many feline gastrointestinal disorders. Low fat diets wereMeat for a long period of time the major recommendation for feeding cats with acute and chronic diarrhea. However, a recent double-blinded clinical trial showed that dietary fat did not affect the outcome of diarrhea in cats.

The current study, conducted by Nestle Purina PetCare Co., looked at the clinical efficacy of a new therapeutic diet for cats with diarrhea. Researchers assigned 16 cats with chronic diarrhea to be fed diet X (Hill’s Prescription i/d Feline) or diet Y (Purina Veterinary Diets EN Gastrointestinal Feline Formula) for 4 weeks while fecal scores were recorded daily for the last week on each diet. Continue reading

Cats Lack Hormone Response to Glucose

The Winn Feline Foundation has just released a study that showed that cats lack a glucose-dependent insulinotropic peptide (GIP) response to glucose. GIP is a hormone secreted from the intestine upon ingestion of glucose or nutrients to stimulate insulin secretion from pancreatic cells. In other words, a hormone that helps metabolize glucose. They concluded, that this lack of GIP response makes the cat relatively glucose intolerant which might lead to inappropriate glycemic control in cats fed a diet high in carbohydrates.

This study proves, yet once again, that cats should have little to no carbs in their diets. A low carbohydrate feline diet is less likely to produce diabetes in a cat and if diabetes does occur, a low carbohydrate diet along with meds may be essential for glucose control in most cats.