Posts Tagged ‘High-protein diet’

Adverse Reactions to Foods in Cats

Cat food for sale at an Istanbul animal market

Cat food for sale at an Istanbul animal market (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

A researcher, P. Roudebush, has compiled information on studies done to determine adverse reactions to foods (ingredients) in cats. Only 10 different studies, representing a total of 56 animals, have described cutaneous lesions, gastrointestinal signs, or both, associated with adverse reactions to specific foods or ingredients.

In these studies, adverse reactions to beef, dairy products, and fish accounted for nearly 90% of all the reported cases in cats.

Animal proteins were reported to cause primarily cutaneous lesions or a combination of cutaneous and gastrointestinal signs, while wheat and corn were more often associated with gastrointestinal signs. No specific food allergens have been identified in cats, thus more research is needed.

Kindle Version of Feline Nutrition Book, Free For Limited Time

"Feline Nutrition" BookBeginning Thursday, September 5 through Monday, September 9, my book, Feline Nutrition – Nutrition for the Optimum Health and Longevity of your Catwill be offered free through Amazon. This applies only to the Kindle version of the book.

The special should begin at midnight PST on the 5th and end at midnight PST on the 9th.

You do not need to have a Kindle to read the book. You can download for free the Kindle app for just about any platform, including your PC.

If you do own a Kindle, you can also loan this book to anyone else who is a Kindle owner. As always, it is part of the Kindle Owners Lending Library (KOLL) and you may borrow the book from Amazon for free at any time.

High-Protein, Low-Carb Cat Food Wins Again

Dietary therapy has been considered important in the management of many feline gastrointestinal disorders. Low fat diets wereMeat for a long period of time the major recommendation for feeding cats with acute and chronic diarrhea. However, a recent double-blinded clinical trial showed that dietary fat did not affect the outcome of diarrhea in cats.

The current study, conducted by Nestle Purina PetCare Co., looked at the clinical efficacy of a new therapeutic diet for cats with diarrhea. Researchers assigned 16 cats with chronic diarrhea to be fed diet X (Hill’s Prescription i/d Feline) or diet Y (Purina Veterinary Diets EN Gastrointestinal Feline Formula) for 4 weeks while fecal scores were recorded daily for the last week on each diet. Continue reading

Feline Obesity – Part 2 – Diet Does Not Mean Starve

So, we know that the typical 4 Step Program doesn’t work. However, steps 1 (reducing quantity) and 4 (exercise) aren’t exactly necessary if you change steps 2 (changing food) and 3 (feeding mealtime), particularly step 2. It really all comes down to the type of food you feed your cat.

While reducing the quantity of food and feeding mealtime only can be helpful, it won’t be unless you change the type of food that is being fed. By feeding the wrong type of food while reducing the quantity, you will essentially be starving your cat. The cat requires high levels of protein in its diet and will begin utilizing its own organs and muscle (digesting them) if given a reduced protein diet or a reduced quantity of food thereby reducing the protein load. The majority of overweight cats are eating a free-choice dry diet. The problem is threefold: too many carbohydrates, not enough animal protein and not enough animal fat. Cats are obligate carnivores, meaning they require certain nutrients that they cannot synthesize which are only found in meat and are able to metabolize only a small amount of carbohydrates. Continue reading