Posts Tagged ‘Carnivore’

Kindle Version of Feline Nutrition Book, Free For Limited Time

"Feline Nutrition" BookBeginning Thursday, September 5 through Monday, September 9, my book, Feline Nutrition – Nutrition for the Optimum Health and Longevity of your Catwill be offered free through Amazon. This applies only to the Kindle version of the book.

The special should begin at midnight PST on the 5th and end at midnight PST on the 9th.

You do not need to have a Kindle to read the book. You can download for free the Kindle app for just about any platform, including your PC.

If you do own a Kindle, you can also loan this book to anyone else who is a Kindle owner. As always, it is part of the Kindle Owners Lending Library (KOLL) and you may borrow the book from Amazon for free at any time.

Feline Obesity – Part 2 – Diet Does Not Mean Starve

So, we know that the typical 4 Step Program doesn’t work. However, steps 1 (reducing quantity) and 4 (exercise) aren’t exactly necessary if you change steps 2 (changing food) and 3 (feeding mealtime), particularly step 2. It really all comes down to the type of food you feed your cat.

While reducing the quantity of food and feeding mealtime only can be helpful, it won’t be unless you change the type of food that is being fed. By feeding the wrong type of food while reducing the quantity, you will essentially be starving your cat. The cat requires high levels of protein in its diet and will begin utilizing its own organs and muscle (digesting them) if given a reduced protein diet or a reduced quantity of food thereby reducing the protein load. The majority of overweight cats are eating a free-choice dry diet. The problem is threefold: too many carbohydrates, not enough animal protein and not enough animal fat. Cats are obligate carnivores, meaning they require certain nutrients that they cannot synthesize which are only found in meat and are able to metabolize only a small amount of carbohydrates. Continue reading

Cats Cannot Taste Sweets

Sweetness is detected by a specific receptor protein (‘taste bud’) in the tongue. Cats are known to be insensitive to sweet tastes. Researchers analyzed the genes encoding the taste buds in twelve different carnivorous species, including cats. They found that those species such as cats, whose diet is exclusively meat-based (obligate carnivores), had lost the gene encoding the taste bud for sweetness. Other affected species included dolphins, sea lions, seals, otters, and hyenas. It appears that the ability to taste sweets has been lost in most carnivorous species since a meat-based diet does not consist of sugars or carbs, there was no need to be able to detect (or enjoy!) these substances. Continue reading