Archive for the ‘Nutrition’ Category

Adverse Reactions to Foods in Cats

Cat food for sale at an Istanbul animal market

Cat food for sale at an Istanbul animal market (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

A researcher, P. Roudebush, has compiled information on studies done to determine adverse reactions to foods (ingredients) in cats. Only 10 different studies, representing a total of 56 animals, have described cutaneous lesions, gastrointestinal signs, or both, associated with adverse reactions to specific foods or ingredients.

In these studies, adverse reactions to beef, dairy products, and fish accounted for nearly 90% of all the reported cases in cats.

Animal proteins were reported to cause primarily cutaneous lesions or a combination of cutaneous and gastrointestinal signs, while wheat and corn were more often associated with gastrointestinal signs. No specific food allergens have been identified in cats, thus more research is needed.

Kindle Version of Feline Nutrition Book, Free For Limited Time

"Feline Nutrition" BookBeginning Thursday, September 5 through Monday, September 9, my book, Feline Nutrition – Nutrition for the Optimum Health and Longevity of your Catwill be offered free through Amazon. This applies only to the Kindle version of the book.

The special should begin at midnight PST on the 5th and end at midnight PST on the 9th.

You do not need to have a Kindle to read the book. You can download for free the Kindle app for just about any platform, including your PC.

If you do own a Kindle, you can also loan this book to anyone else who is a Kindle owner. As always, it is part of the Kindle Owners Lending Library (KOLL) and you may borrow the book from Amazon for free at any time.

Eat Like Your Cat?

So, it’s been a while since I last posted. But I’m back. I, unfortunately, lost one of my cats last December, which I’m still Ravenreeling from. He was the most amazing creature, rescued twelve years ago from the streets. This is his picture. He was diagnosed with a brain tumor and heart condition a year before he died. I am certain that his diet is what kept him going that last year, right till the end.

Then to start the new year off, I was diagnosed with vitamin D deficiency. Let me tell you, it really sucks! Luckily, I was diagnosed immediately. Many people have these crazy symptoms (heart palpitations, erratic blood pressure, erratic pulse, fatigue, depression, anxiety, aches and pains and many more symptoms) and their vitamin D levels are never checked and they are misdiagnosed with depression, MS, lupus, autoimmune disease, etc. It’s now stated by many experts that a high percentage of people worldwide are deficient. Go get yourself tested. You don’t want to experience this – EVER!

And as though this wasn’t enough, I thought a lifestyle change would do me good. I have been feeding my cats a homemade raw diet for over two years now and the changes they have experienced are great. Well, if an ancestral diet is good for them, then of course, I reasoned it would be good for me. Continue reading

High-Protein, Low-Carb Cat Food Wins Again

Dietary therapy has been considered important in the management of many feline gastrointestinal disorders. Low fat diets wereMeat for a long period of time the major recommendation for feeding cats with acute and chronic diarrhea. However, a recent double-blinded clinical trial showed that dietary fat did not affect the outcome of diarrhea in cats.

The current study, conducted by Nestle Purina PetCare Co., looked at the clinical efficacy of a new therapeutic diet for cats with diarrhea. Researchers assigned 16 cats with chronic diarrhea to be fed diet X (Hill’s Prescription i/d Feline) or diet Y (Purina Veterinary Diets EN Gastrointestinal Feline Formula) for 4 weeks while fecal scores were recorded daily for the last week on each diet. Continue reading

Cats Lack Hormone Response to Glucose

The Winn Feline Foundation has just released a study that showed that cats lack a glucose-dependent insulinotropic peptide (GIP) response to glucose. GIP is a hormone secreted from the intestine upon ingestion of glucose or nutrients to stimulate insulin secretion from pancreatic cells. In other words, a hormone that helps metabolize glucose. They concluded, that this lack of GIP response makes the cat relatively glucose intolerant which might lead to inappropriate glycemic control in cats fed a diet high in carbohydrates.

This study proves, yet once again, that cats should have little to no carbs in their diets. A low carbohydrate feline diet is less likely to produce diabetes in a cat and if diabetes does occur, a low carbohydrate diet along with meds may be essential for glucose control in most cats.

FDA Safety Reporting Portal for Pet Food

Millions of pets consume commercial pet food (and treats) daily. Pet food may become contaminated with bacteria, molds, storage mites, and/or chemicals. The foods may also contain inappropriate amounts of nutrients such as too much zinc or low levels of niacin. If you think your pet may have become ill from eating pet food or pet treats seek veterinary assistance for your pet immediately.

In order for the FDA CVM (Center for Veterinary Medicine) to investigate your pet’s illness, have your veterinarian report the problem to them. You should report the problem to the FDA as well. You or your veterinarian can electronically report cases of animal illness associated with pet foods/treats through the Safety Reporting Portal, or by calling the FDA Consumer Complaint Coordinators in your state. Continue reading

Feline Obesity – Part 4 – Choosing a Feline Diet for Weight Loss and Maintenance

The good thing about choosing a weight loss food for cats is that the food will be used for maintenance as well. The following is a short list of requirements for choosing a commercial cat food. If the commercial food in question, meets the following criteria, then look for the quality of ingredients and question the company as to the source of those ingredients. (Percentages are on a dry matter basis – DMB*).

  • Protein – from meat and over 45%
  • Fat – from meat and over 25%
  • Carbohydrates – 0% but not over 10%
  • Water – at least 60% (not DMB) this excludes all dry and semi-moist foods!
  • Grain-free and soy-free

Basically, the best cat food is a wet food that contains lots of meat and fat. It is as simple as that. Cat food should never contain any grain, soy, vegetables, fruits or ingredients from plant sources such as flaxseed oil. These ingredients are poorly, if at all, used by the cat. I also recommend canned cat food that contains some organ meat such as liver or kidney (heart is considered muscle meat); many varieties contain none. Continue reading